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A Time-Lapse Video Capturing Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse

Image credit: Alfredo Garcia.

On the early morning of April 15, 2014, stargazers had the rare opportunity to observe a total lunar eclipse. When Earth, the moon and the sun were all aligned, our planet shut up the direct light from the sun to the full moon. However, owing to the reflected light from umbral shadow of Earth, the moon looked quite red.

As it was the first in a tetrad of total lunar eclipses, such event was totally special in the eyes of stargazers. The second one can be observed in October, and then the third in April 2015 and the last one will appear in September 2015.

People in the most parts in the western hemisphere could view the amazing eclipse. For those who were not in the observation area or fail to observe it outside, they could watch it through the webcasts.

To compensate the regret of those unable to watch such a splendid eclipse in any way, the Griffith Observatory located in Los Angeles, California has documented it from the beginning to the end and produced a time-lapse video, by which you are able to view this marvelous eclipse at home.

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