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Category: Archaeology

Image credit: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London. As the Ice Age was ending, humans fashioned skulls into drinking vessels and left teeth marks on bones.

Evidence of Cannibalism Found in Ancient Humans

It is said that ancient humans who resided in the southern part of England at the period of the last ice age would use human skulls as drinking vessels. But it is not clear whether it was a way of showing respects to their lost loved ones, or the sign [...]

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Archaeologists Unearth Genghis Khan’s Lost Fortress in Western Mongolia

Archaeologists Unearth Genghis Khan’s Lost Fortress in Western Mongolia

Named as Temujin when he was born in 1162, Genghis Khan has been regarded as one of the most powerful military leaders in history thanks to his great success of building and ruling the Mongol Empire. By the time when he died, his empire had expanded from the eastern regions [...]

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Image credit: A couple who have been holding hands for 700 years have been uncovered at the ‘lost’ chapel of St. Morrell in Leicestershire. Credit: University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS)

Skeleton Couple Unearthed Holding Hands for 700 Years

“Til death do us part” is the very popular saying describing the true love between wife and husband. However the new finding of scientists may change it in some unusual case. Recently, during excavation of the ”lost” chapel of St. Morrell in east Leicestershire, archeologists from the University of Leicester have unearthed eleven human [...]

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Image credit: Modern-day Canadian Inuit and their environment / Carsten Egevang

New DNA Study Reveals the Prehistory of the New World Arctic

It is widely accepted that the barren and cold Arctic should be the last part of the Americas where modern humans came to live. However, there has been hotly debated by scientists about who the first Eskimos were and at what time they arrived there. According to the article published [...]

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Angkor Wat temple complex.

500-Year-Old Wall Paintings Revealed from Angkor Wat

A series of previously unnoticed images consisting of paintings of boats, animals, deities and buildings has been discovered on the walls of Cambodia’s ancient Angkor Wat temple. Rock art researchers believe the paintings belong to a specific phase of the temple’s history in the 16th century CE when it was [...]

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Aradus macrosomus, a 9.2-mm-long female, in dorsal and ventral view. Image credit: Ernst Heiss.

New Fossil Bug Species Unearthed from 45-Million-Year-Old Baltic Amber

Dr Ernst Heiss from the Tiroler Landesmuseum in Innsbruck, Austria, has described a new extinct species of flat bug. Baltic amber, the fossilized tree resin, has been discovered on or near the shores of the eastern Baltic Sea. This amber contains extremely rich clues about the botanical and zoological objects, [...]

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A tooth of Dakosaurus maximus in lingual, labial, basal and apical view. Scale bar – 1 cm. Image credit: Mark T. Young et al.

Huge Tooth Fossil of Dakosaurus Maximus Found by UK Scientists

Dr. Mark Young and his team from the University of Edinburgh have found a unique fossilized tooth of Dakosaurus maximus, which is thought to be a prehistoric relative of modern crocodiles. Dakosaurus maximus used to live in the shallow seas, where is now the part of Europe, in the period [...]

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Outcrop photographs from the Bow City crater: top – panoramic view; bottom – a close-up showing thrust faults, outlined in red; geologist kneeling on outcrop, black arrow, for scale. Image credit: Paul Glombick et al.

Ancient Impact Crater Is Found in Canada

Scientists from Alberta Geological Survey and the University of Alberta have revealed an 8 km wide bowl-shaped impact crater near Bow City in southern Alberta. The researchers from the University of Alberta and Alberta Geological Survey have discovered an impact crater near Bow City in southern Alberta, which looked like [...]

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Drawing of a wall painting from the tomb of Djehutihotep, a semi-feudal ruler of an Ancient Egyptian province, 1880 BC. A person standing at the front of the sled is pouring water onto the sand.

A Study Finds Ancient Egyptians Transported Big Objects over Wet Sand

The new study, published in the journal of Physical Review Letters, has demonstrated that ancient Egyptians applied a simple approach to moistening the sand and then transporting heavy colossi and pyramid stones by sledge in a much easier way. In order to construct pyramids, ancient Egyptians were forced to transport heavy [...]

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Ancient Sea Creatures Filtered Foods Like Modern Whales

Ancient Sea Creatures Filtered Foods Like Modern Whales

Based on the finding of the new fossils in northern Greenland, it is reported that ancient, giant marine animals were able to utilize mysterious facial appendages to filter food they need from the ocean. The research done by the group of scientists from the University of Bristol shows the way [...]

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