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Category: Science Blog

If You “Like” Something Online, Others Might Do the Same

If You “Like” Something Online, Others Might Do the Same

The “like” you give for a Facebook page or the restaurant review you post on Yelp.com might not be able to change the world, but they will actually influence, in one way or another, those who see these information. Lev Muchnik and his colleagues from Hebrew University of Jerusalem teamed [...]

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Staying Up Late Can Lead to Weight Gain

Staying Up Late Can Lead to Weight Gain

The research on the influence of staying up late on weight gain has some new results, at least for males. The official publication of the Obesity Society, Obesity Journal, published a new research several days ago that some Swedish researchers found that males who had no sleep for last night [...]

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It Is Difficult to Have No Bias in Scientific Research

It Is Difficult to Have No Bias in Scientific Research

The path to seek truth is not smooth. Bias in scientific results is always a great obstacle to impede scientific development. In a recent research published on PNAS, English scientists found that exaggeration in scientific research is more likely to happen in behavioristics research, especially for American researchers. Daniele Fanelli, [...]

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Special Function of Money: Maintain Relationship and Cooperation

Special Function of Money: Maintain Relationship and Cooperation

Money isn’t everything but without money you have nothing. Money can maintain the relationship and cooperation between people to promote social prosperity. Human’s ancestors co-operated by organizing small and compact groups. In modern society, social prosperity is based on coordination and effort between strangers. Gabriele Camera, Professor of Economics in [...]

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The Science of Science Communication—How to Communicate Science to the Public?

The Science of Science Communication—How to Communicate Science to the Public?

This September, National Academy of Sciences is going to hold the second Sackler Colloquia discussing science communication. A few days ago, Baruch Fischhoff, a Professor in Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University, reviewed the contents of the first Sackler colloquia (May, 2012) on [...]

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Open Access Peer-Reviewed Papers Have Reached a Tipping Point and Become the Mainstream

Open Access Peer-Reviewed Papers Have Reached a Tipping Point and Become the Mainstream

A European Commission funded study claims that more and more peer-reviewed papers are available freely for the public in the form of open access publications. In the above figure, the purple curve represents the total amount of peer-reviewed papers that are published on free-to-read journals, the green curve shows the [...]

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Want to Spend Less When Shopping? Wear Your High Heels!

Want to Spend Less When Shopping? Wear Your High Heels!

A marketing research from Brigham Young University reveals that when consumers are focusing on the balance of their body while shopping, for example, when they are wearing high heels, they will think in a different way. For ladies who are considering making a big purchase such as a television, we [...]

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Why Is It So Difficult to Lose Weight?

Why Is It So Difficult to Lose Weight?

Everyone knows that the best way to deal with obesity is to eat less and exercise more. However, it is easy to become fat from being lean, while it is difficult to do in the opposite way. So eating less and exercise more is not a simple issue to be [...]

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A Full-Of-Memories Wedding Ring—Romance of a Geek

A Full-Of-Memories Wedding Ring—Romance of a Geek

Ray Arifianto, a geek who works for the XBOX platform team at Microsoft, is getting married. He got the nerdiest wedding ring ever from his lovely fiancée.   From the image we can see that the wedding ring is customized to have the shape of a USB drive. Ray thinks [...]

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Wired: Search for a Cure of Parkinson’s Disease

Wired: Search for a Cure of Parkinson’s Disease

Sergey Brin, one of the founders of Google, has been diagnosed to have mutated LRRK2 gene, which can increase the rate of Parkinson’s disease by 30 % to 75 %. As you may know, Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder that occurs on the central nervous system. When found [...]

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