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Small Mite, the World’s Fastest Land Animal, Size-For-Size

This is one fast invertebrate.

cheetah

Cheetahs are regarded to be the absolutely fastest land animals in the world. However compared with the size of its body, a small mite native to Southern Californian is much faster than cheetahs. Image credit: Joachim Huber via Wikimedia Commons.

Cheetahs are regarded to be the absolutely fastest land animals in the world. However compared with the size of its body, a small mite native to Southern Californian is much faster than cheetahs.

Known as Paratarsotomus macropalpis, the mite can travel 322 body lengths in a second. The finding has been released by researchers recently.

If we are intended to translate such speed into human terms, the fact will be surprisingly amazing.

Given the hypothesis that a human could travel 322 body lengths in just a simple second, he would cover 1,300 miles per hour. With such speed, a human runner would be able to go around the Earth by a circle in less than 20 hours. And he could also take a round trip from Seattle of Washington State to San Francisco just for a cup of coffee in nearly 75 minutes. In this respect, cheetahs will rank as the top in travelling about 16 body lengths per second, roughly equal to 70 miles per hour.

According to the report from Science Magazine, the relatively fastest speed recorded previously was the Australian tiger beetle that was able to travel at 171 body lengths per second.

In order to document the mite’s speed, the researchers applied a high-speed camera for recording. Their finding was released at 2014 Experimental Biology Conference held in San Diego and also published in the FASEB Journal.

To the surprise of the researchers, the mite can also make stop and change their directions much rapidly. Even under asphalt reaching temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit, it   can survive while most creatures would fail to withstand such hot temperature.

If the scientists could better understand about how the mite copes with its thing, it would help them design better versions of tiny robots in the future.

Source: Science Magazine

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